Tag Archives: burgundy

November Wine of the Month Club

With the holiday season upon us, we are leaning heavily on tried and true traditions for this wine box. For the complex meal that is the American Thanksgiving, it is a difficult task to match wine to each flavor and component…but we’re up to the challenge.

Starting with white, we’ve picked a classic Burgundian bottle, one that constantly challenges the preconceptions about Chardonnay, and continues to win itself adamant devotees. On the red side of things, whether you drink them with turkey or not, the cooler days in this month require bottles with depth and substance. A red Beaujolais for example, has enough tangy fruit to match any gravy, and at the Cru level, it is serious enough for chilly November evenings. The last red you’ll find doesn’t follow any wine handbook for this time of year, but we think its unique flavors and sultry body will make it your new holiday favorite!

Domaine Arnaud Chopin Cotes de Nuits Villages Blanc Les Monts de Boncourt 2008With the esteemed name of Arnaud Chopin and the noted tradition of white Burgundy as a perfect choice for the Thanksgiving holiday, we think we’ve found you a pretty killer bottle of wine. Following in his grandfather’s footsteps, for whom the domaine is named, Arnaud Chopin has gained a respectable reputation for crafting classically elegant Burgundian wines on his family’s small estate. This 2008 Les Monts de Boncourt is entirely barrel-aged in new oak, but instead of dominating the wine like those California oak bombs most people think of when they hear Chardonnay, the oak aging here merely enhances the fruit concentration. Elegant and complex, this wine shows an impressive amount of freshness and acidity on the palate, which elevate the simple notes of toast and citrus.

Domaine de Colette Moulin-à-vent Vieilles Vignes 2012We thought it was appropriate for a traditional white Burgundy to be followed by a traditional red Burgundy. Instead of the famed Pinot Noir of this area, we choose a bottle from the region to the south of Burgundy: Beaujolais, in which the variety Gamay reigns supreme. This Cru bottle of Gamay comes from Moulin A Vent, one of the ten villages in which Cru Beaujolais can be made. Domaine de Colette is home to Jacky and Eveylne Gauthier who live in Lantignie, but own small vineyard plots in four of the ten villages. Jacky Gauthier is a 4th generation winemaker who started his career in viticulture at age 17. The Gauthier couple care greatly about the ecosystem in which they grow their wines, which is why they use only sustainable practices for their vinegrowing. Showing as a great example of its prestigious terrior this 2012 bottle is silky smooth, but well built with ripe fruit aromas of dark berries, dried roses, and musky forest floor.

Leonardo Bussoletti Brecciaro 2014The last bottle in this wine box strays from our traditional French path over to central Italy, where the mystery grape variety Ciliegolo is being revived. At the front of this revival is Leonardo Bussoletti, the ambitious winemaker who took control of his family’s small vineyard in 2009, of which he devoted 70% to growing Ciliegolo. Mostly known as a blending variety in Chianti, Ciliegolo’s roots date back to the 1200’s in Umbria, yet little of it is still seen in these parts due to the difficulty and care it requires to properly grow. Leonardo brings a certain elegance to his wines; one that could be compared to that of Burgundy – a region of which he is fond of. Brecciaro has the tart, cherry nuances akin to the other Chianti varieties, but its dark, silky body carries an air of sophistication that delights and lingers.

Edible Gifts

The Gracious Gourmet Dried Fruit ChutneyBecause a November box just wouldn’t be complete without a turkey pairing–let us introduce you to the Gracious Gourmet’s Dried Fruit Chutney. These days Nancy Wekselbaum’s company makes a dozen or so beautiful jams and spreads, but the operation began in her kitchen as a vehicle for Nancy’s signature homemade chutney. Made with dried apricots, cherries, dates, and cranberries as well as a bevy of Indian spices, this classic has become a pantry staple for us. It’s a natural pairing with virtually any protein, but we’re partial to enjoying it with cheese as well (put a spoonful on a dollop of fresh goat cheese for a perfect appetizer). Whether you dish it up next to the bird or save it for dessert, we think your guests will thank you.

Cocoa Sante Mocha Hot CocoaFounded by two Massachusetts mothers, Cocoa Sante was born of the need for a wholesome sweet treat. Not wanting to fuel her kids with the processed ingredients in store-bought cocoas, owner Jen experimented until she struck gold with the Nor’Easter recipe–the classic cocoa we use here at AP. The beauty of all Cocoa Sante blends (in addition to their ethical sourcing and organic ingredients) is that they contain milk powder so you can simply use hot water and mix – no saucepan required. The Mocha blend we selected contains a blend of organic cocoa powder and 100% Arabica bean coffee for just enough giddy-up to get you up and out the door.

La Casera NerinaThis Thanksgiving (and everyday, really) we’re thankful for La Casera, the Italian cheese shop that’s responsible for the export of so many of our lovely Italian cheeses. Much like Boston’s own Formaggio Kitchen, truly the granddaddy of all American cheese shops, La Casera expanded the family business from merely a storefront, to a cheese aging and international shipping operation. Second generation owner Eros Buratti purchases cheeses directly from local Piedmontese farmers to age under close observation in their cellars until they reach optimum ripeness. These little guys may look a bit spooky, but we promise they’re anything but. Nerina (literally “little black one”) are dusted in edible vegetable ash before aging just two to three weeks, developing a distinctive geotrichum rind. Made from cow’s, goat’s, and sheep’s milk, Nerina’s flavors are creamy and tangy, with a fudgy texture, gooier at the rind. Decadent perfection with a smear of honey.

All photos taken by Caley Mahoney.

Call the store at (617) 269-6100, email us at info@americanprovisions.com, or ask a staffer for more information on signing yourself or someone you love up for the Beer or Wine of the Month Club! 

January Wine & Beer of the Month Boxes

New Year’s Resolutions….

…you may have set them for yourself — you might even be keeping to them still! At American Provisions we have resolved to ignore any pressure to diet and to just keep consuming what we like. Resolve to live for today (or at least that is what we are telling ourselves as we continue to consume meats, sweets, beers, and CHEESE)!

Seasonal guidelines suggest we should only be drinking stouts and porters during the winter months…well, we think these guidelines are a little too restricting. So, we will be enjoying our hoppy IPAs with no shame, and no hesitation, as these bottles carry enough weight to keep you just as warm in these chilly temps as the dark porter will. So go for a run! But then come home and enjoy these beers with no regrets in the New Year!

Dem Bottles

Foley Brothers Prospect Imperial IPAQuietly nestled down an unpaved road in quaint Brandon, Vermont, the Foley Brother’s small facility looks more like an extra garage next to an eldering Victorian house, rather than a killer beer making facility. It is in this magical Northern oasis that quintessential Vermont-esque beers are crafted by the hard working team of Foley Brothers Brewing. Prospect, a double IPA, is yet another example of the excellent quality we have come to expect from Foley Brothers, who have rightfully earned a coveted spot among the Vermont “must haves” of the beer world. Citra and Galaxy hops satiate this beer with profusely strong tropical fruit flavors. Candied mango, passionfruit, and pineapple notes ride a soft wave of creamy carbonation towards your taste buds, along with a touch of biscuit-y malts. Prospect will have you gladly looking to the future, because with beers as good as this, the new year looks bright. ABV {9%}

Crux Fermentation Project Half Hitch DIPACrux Fermentation Project is aptly named because of the constant innovation and creativity of this Oregon brewery when it comes to challenging the way beer is made. Brewmaster Larry Sidor and his team use a plethora of non traditional methods in their brewing process, which is not only risky but difficult if not done right. Thankfully for us, these guys are awesome at what they do, which makes their “project” results even more enjoyable. With their double IPA Half Hitch, they challenge the idea of what an Imperial should be, first off by cleverly hiding its boozy 10% content. The use of Mosaic hops ramps this beer up with incredible tropical fruits like mango, peach, and lemon, all floating on a fluffy medium body. ABV {10%}

Ithaca Beer Co. 18th Anniversary Baltic PorterThere had to be one dark beer in this January box, and when we say dark, we mean DARK. To celebrate their 18th year of brewing, this Finger Lake brewery released their version of a historical beer style, the Baltic Porter. Pouring out as black liquid velvet, Ithaca’s 18th Anniversary Baltic Porter, has that “coat your insides” quality we look for during the colder months. We recommend giving this big bottle some time to open up in order to fully enjoy the nose of light cocoa, chocolate, and coffee notes. Smooth and sultry, this Baltic Porter is full of sweet toffee, caramel, and interesting dark fruit flavors like notes of cherry from the use of cherrywood smoked malts. ABV {7%}

Winter Wines

Winter wines, mean cracking into the older, aged bottles we have been saving. The colder months may force us into hermitdom, but as long as we are stuck inside, we might as well enjoy ourselves with a few bottles of rich red wines. Drinking seasonally in the winter can fashion a sophisticated experience as we dive into reds with loads of complexity and flavors that have been carefully crafted over several years of aging.

Despite our enjoyment in drinking seasonally, we also wish to challenge the resistance to white wines in the winter. White wine, with enough body and acidity, can be the perfect companion to cut through the rich roasts and fatty foods we consume throughout the chilly days.

Domaine A. Chopin et Fils Cotes de Nuits Villages Blanc 2008Chardonnay may seem like the obvious choice for a winter wine box, but this is no oaky, butter laced California Chard that you will be enjoying. From the esteemed Cotes de Nuits Village of Burgundy, we have for you the 2008 Boncourt from Domaine A. Chopin et Fils. Currently in the talented hands of Arnaud Chopin, this noted domaine was purposefully downsized in order to better focus on the best parcels of land out of which the Chopin family is handcrafting a smaller number of truly classic, elegant wines. With a lengthy bottle aging, Chopin’s Boncourt Les Monts is immensely rich and complex; full of toasted oak notes and vibrant citrus fruit, this 100% Chardonnay is ready and able to stand up to a hefty January meal.

Domaine Thunevin-Calvet Cuvée Constance 2009:The seductive aspect of high quality soil and vines in the Roussillon region of the Languedoc is what influenced Jean-Luc Thunevin to buy a few hectares there in 2000. It was at this time that he partnered up with the native winemaker Jean- Roger Calvet to begin their Cuvée Constance project. When they began this fortuitous partnership, they were making their wines in something genuinely resembling a garage. Many vintages later, we have the current display of their hard work in this 2009 blend of Grenache and Carignan. Pouring an inky dark violet color with ruby edges, the 2009 is earthy with notes of juniper and cool stone among the textured fruit flavors of black raspberry and plum.

Le Calle Poggio D’Oro 2005The final and eldest bottle in this January wine box comes to us from Tuscany’s coastal village Montecucco, where Le Calle resides. Riccardo Catocci, the owner of Le Calle, makes his wines from certified organic grapes, a practice that he utilizes in the growing of the several other agricultural products on his farm. Unlike an entry level Rosso blend using Sangiovese grapes that is fresh and juicy, this straight Montecucco Sangiovese is an excellent display of how dark and rich this variety can become. Le Calle’s 2005 vintage is dry and intense, due to extended aging in small oak barrels. The muscular body of this Sangiovese is filled by dark cherry and herbaceous notes, perfect for a rich meal by the fire.

Treats

Willow Hill Farm La FleurieScrew resolutions this year and dive right into the oozey butter round of cheese from Willow Hill Farm. Another spectacular cheese producer from Vermont, Willow Hill farm is run by a husband and wife team who make and age their handcrafted cheeses on site of their Burlington farm. All of their cheese are aged in an unique underground cave that was built eight feet underground into the natural bedrock of the landscape! La Fleurie is their only bloomy rind, cow’s milk cheese, similar in style to a French Camembert. La Fleurie is bright and fruity when young, while showing notes of rich mushroom as it ages.

Red Table SalbandoIgnoring dieting resolutions continues and gets easier when you come face to face with the exceptionally made cured meats from Red Table Meat Co out of Minneapolis. This small farm to fork company was the predestined product of Minnesota native Mike Phillips. His passion for carefully crafted products, as well as his dedication to humane livestock practices are key factors that make Red Table meats so great. This hunk of meat you have before you is a spicy Sopressata style salami called Salbando. Made with black pepper, red pepper, garlic, and white wine, the subtle spice of Salbando will creep up on you, as a killer addition to your morning eggs or just chunked off straight into your mouth.

Sweet Lydia’s Stout & Pretzel Marshmallows:  We hope that even wine lovers can appreciate the last treat in this January box: locally made Stout and Pretzel Marshmallows from Sweet Lydia’s. A local sweet shop that started at out as a small kitchen operation for friends and family of the famed Lydia, this small business in Lowell is cranking out several varieties of custom made treats! From gourmet smores to handmade candy bars, Lydia’s creativity is only  matched by her delicious products. Exemplifying their hand crafted aesthetic and support for locally made products, Sweet Lydia’s stout and pretzel marshmallows are made using Ipswich Brewery’s Oatmeal Stout, as well as other high quality ingredients.

Call the store at (617) 269-6100, email us at info@americanprovisions.com, or ask a staffer for more information on signing yourself or someone you love up for the Beer or Wine of the Month Club!

November Beer & Wine of the Month Club

We have family on our minds as we watch fall chill slowly into winter. Often the promise of an upcoming reunion or cozy gathering is what keeps us feeling the glow of sunlight long after the days get shorter. We feel prepared to tackle the upcoming blizzards because we spend this time strengthening our arsenal of good people, soothing drinks, and rich, celebratory foods.

vscocam844The beers in this month’s box feature high ABVs to heat your bones on a chilly night, dark malty bodies that make them feel decadent and lush–and the wines are equally full and robust. These bottles taste like ripe red fruits and vanilla, toasted nuts and spice—all flavors of the holidays. And the food pairings all come from American artisans who work closely with their families to make the products in your box. These are folks who understand the restorative power of family—be it your given family or your chosen family. It’s what gets us through, so we welcome you to batten down the hatches and enjoy these warming brews with those who mean the most to you this November. Continue reading

Talking Holiday Wine with Vineyard Research

We love local. You all know this, and I bet you could list some of the criteria we look for when sourcing new products, because we talk about them all the time. Proximity to the store, the use of ingredients made nearby or farmed without harsh chemicals. Visibility, traceability, sustainability. It’s second nature to our buyers, a rote set of values that we nevertheless hold extremely dear.

So you can imagine how hard it is for us to loosen the reins and trust someone else to be our eyes and ears on the ground when it comes to wine buying. We can’t go to France as often as we go to Vermont, and we don’t casually meet winemakers at local street fairs the way we happen upon, say, a new cheesemaker at a farmers market. Because some of the world’s best wines are made overseas, and because we want to sell only the best, we have to seek out amazing people to go over there and find the best for us.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 presetOne of these people is Mike Ryals, one half of the team at Vineyard Research. Based in Foxborough, Massachusetts, VR is Mike and David Raines, who both log plenty of ground miles in Europe seeking out the smaller, less well-known vineyards and tasting what they have to offer. David started VR 12 years ago, and Mike joined in shortly thereafter. Together they seek out a certain hidden value, from little guys off the beaten path who may not have the name recognition of their counterparts, but who are working with the same soil and climate. Continue reading